Commemorating the First World War in Outwell, Norfolk

Dr Charles Nelson, Membership Secretary, Friends of St Clement’s Church, Outwell has been in touch to tell us of a wonderful event held at the church and how to still see some of the work involved.

A spectacular cascade of scarlet, red and  crimson poppies – knitted, crocheted, sewn or needle-felted by members of Welle Women’s Institute and St Clement’s Coffee Shoppers, particularly Elaine Allison, Rebecca Broda, Victoria Brown, Helen Crittle, Sally Harman, Edna Hollands, Margaret Lake, Liz Robson, Ruth Saunders and Linda Shinkin – was “unveiled” on Friday last, 5 October 2018, at St Clement’s Church, Outwell. The cascade of poppies, stitched onto white camouflage webbing, falls from the summit of the staircase in the South Aisle of St Clement’s, and is part of the parish’s commemoration of the centenary of the end of the First World War. The cascade will remain in place until mid-November.
 
The “unveiling” occurred at a very successful concert given by the Upwell Gilbert and Sullivan Choral Society, also a tribute to mark the anniversary.
 
The cascade can be viewed by visitors during the normal Sunday service in St Clement’s, and on Tuesdays when the St Clement’s Coffee Shop is open. [Coffee, tea and cakes are served as well as delicious soup and light lunches. The proceeds from the Coffee Shop go to help keep St Clement’s open for worship.]
 
Other projects currently being supported by the Friends of St Clement’s Church include restoration of some of the antique furniture, including two massive wooden trunks and a fine Jacobean communion table, work funded also by a grant from the Leche Trust. The stabilising and protecting of the splendid mediaeval painted glass, especially that dating from 1420–1440 in the tracery of east window of the Beaupré Chapel in St Clement’s, is also a current project, assisted by the Glaziers Trust.
We thank Dr Nelson for sharing this with us, and also Mr Ashby for taking such lovely photos. If you attended the concert, or you have other WW1 commemoration projects happening, please do let us know.
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Commemorating the Great War in Norwich

As the 100th Anniversary of the 1918 Armistice approaches we are being told of more commemoration events being held here in the city.

The Castle Museum is holding an exhibition called “Armistice: Legacy of the Great War in Norfolk” which opens on Saturday 20th October and runs until 6th January 2019.  The new Castle brochure which can be picked up in the Norwich Forum and at Tourist Information Offices (as well as many other county locations) is full of event listings supporting this exhibition – and regular blog readers may spot some familiar names and themes!

In addition to this wonderful exhibition, The Forum in Norwich is also holding a building wide, free exhibition between the 1st and 13th November.  Continue reading

Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace exhibition

Although I have now lived in Norfolk for over 20 years I return to Kent to see family on a regular basis, my last visit coincided with a 14-18 Commemoration Project in my home town’s Remembrance Gardens.

Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace is a large out-door exhibition which covers much of the history of World War One (accompanied by amazing modern photography) which is interspersed with panels explaining how the war impacted on Ashford and the surrounding area.

It took well over an hour to wander around the whole exhibition and read the panels and even after how much work and research I’ve undertaken in the past few years there were so many bits of new information to pick up.

This exhibition is touring and if you missed it in Ashford it will be visiting Worcester and London before November – full details here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the panels around the park I also found two more moving tributes to those who served in WW1, and I think that these will remain in situ after the exhibition has moved on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On leaving the park we discovered one more World War One art installation. Many tanks were given to towns and cities after the war but Ashford has one of the only remaining ones left on display. This piece of unique history is commemorated in, of all things, topiary…

 

If you can get to see this exhibition as it tours the country I do recommend it. It ticked all of my interest boxes – history, local history, personal stories and excellent photography – to which these images from my mobile phone do no justice at all.

If you visit any exhibitions like this, or any other WW1 related places this summer please do let us know – we’d love to share them with others.