An update on our poppy project

We’d like to extend a huge thank you to everyone who has been making poppies from whatever material is to hand. With just six months to go until the Armistice 100 Commemorations we thought you’d like an up date of how the poppy appeal is progressing and where you’ll be able to see the poppies.

For reasons of space and storage the main focus has been on working on how to display the felt, knitted and crochet poppies. As of the 5th May we have received about 3700. These are being put on to fabric tape ready to be displayed like bunting.

Small display of woolen poppies

People are also being very creative with paper, crepe paper and even cupcake cases and we have over 600 of these too.

The mathematically inclined will have already worked out that this gives us a total of 4,300 poppies so we have quite a way to go to reach our target of 15,500!

If anyone has some spare time/wool/paper please could you consider making a few to help us out.  We are planning to hold simple poppy craft sessions in libraries on Norfolk Day (27th July) more details on here very soon.

As for displaying the finished poppies…all of Norfolk’s 47 branches will be taking a number of them to display, as will the mobile libraries.  Larger libraries will have slightly larger displays and King’s Lynn, Great Yarmouth and the Millennium Library will have huge displays representing the large number of fallen commemorated in these locations.

Thank you for your help so far, sample patterns can be found here – but please don’t feel these are the only way to make the poppies.

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Inspired by our poppy plea

We’ve just received this lovely letter from Alex in Sheringham

I work as a Library & Information Assistant at Sheringham Library. In June 2017, a poster arrived for display in the Library asking people to make poppies for the Norfolk in WW1 Project.

My grandad had lost his father and his brother in this war, so I decided to make a few poppies. 300 crochet’d poppies later, I turned my attention to Sheringham, where I have lived for 17 years.

Sheringham & Beeston Regis lost 75 men in WW1 and Upper Sheringham lost 8.

I crochet’d 83 poppies and with the help of the Imperial War Museum, the Royal British Legion and Roll of Honour.com. I was able to individually dedicate each poppy with the “fallen” man’s name, typed onto a label and threaded through the poppy.

The poppies have been framed and are on permanent display in Sheringham Library.

Alex’s 300+ poppies have already been strung together ready for display in the autumn, but do pop into Sheringham Library to see these wonderful, named poppies.

2018 Poppy Project Update

For various reasons there have been fewer posts going out on the blog over the last few months and we hope that is about to change and that we’ll be sharing more stories with you very soon.

In the meantime we’d like to say a huge

to everyone around the county who has been making and sending us poppies.

Behind the scenes we have been working on these and are starting to work out how they can be best displayed in the libraries around the county in November 2018.

Here are just a few (2215 to be precise) of the knitted poppies mounted on to bunting tape ready for display:

We also have lots of beautiful felt, plastic and paper poppies still to mount but this is an ongoing project and if you feel at all crafty please do swamp us with more – full details can be found here.

The Assembly Memorial Chairs exhibition in Norwich

The team at St Peter Mancroft Church in the centre of Norwich have been in touch to let us know about the wonderful World War One exhibition they will be holding from October 25th onward:

We will be hosting an art installation entitled ‘Assembly – Memorial Chairs’  by Derbyshire artist Val Carman, which will be on display in the church from 10am-3.30pm Monday to Saturday from 25 October – 23 November 2017.  This period is particularly poignant given that the centenary of the end of the Battle of Passchendaele is on 10 November 2017.

The installation consists of five chairs from Passchendaele’s St Audomarus Church – each representing the casualties of one year of the war 1914-1918 which will be shown by small lead numbers on each chair.

Next to the chairs there will be a book with the names of the fallen printed on the left hand side. The blank pages left on the right hand side are for visitors to write their own testimony or personal story.  Any story or local references to WW1 can be added to the book – photocopies of images and letters are also welcome.

The Revd Canon Ian Bentley, interim vicar of St Peter Mancroft said:   “The simplicity of this exhibition is very moving and we are honoured to have the installation in Norfolk during the centenary of Passchendaele to act as a focus for remembrance season.  To mark the centenary of WW1 many parishes in Norfolk will have carried out research on the names on their war memorials.  I encourage you all to visit, look for names in the book that you recognise and make sure that Norfolk stories from WW1 are recorded in this lasting memorial.”

‘Assembly’ will visit 15 significant sites during its journey and in 2018 the book and the chairs will be returned to Ypres and so we are very proud and excited that St Peter Mancroft forms part of this tour.

The team planning this wonderful exhibition are launching the exhibition with the following event:

  • A preview viewing, with talk from the artist, in the evening of 24th October

 

As we get more details we will share them but if you are in the city during this time the exhibition sounds unmissable – if you’d like any more information then please contact Geoff Woolsey-Brown 07752 025296 / 01603 617301 or visit https://assemblymemorialchairs.wordpress.com/

Commemorative Crafting

Commemorative Crafting

There’s nothing better on a grey and drizzly Saturday afternoon than spending time with friends – chatting, snacking, and making things! My friend Felicity and I like to tackle new craft projects, and when Norfolk Libraries decided to mark the 2018 Armistice Centenary with a handmade poppy to represent each fallen Norfolk soldier we really wanted to take part.

The poppies can be made from any material you like – felt, wool, paper, card, fabric, or we’ve even had stained glass ones donated. The only stipulations are that they have to be made by hand and we need 15,500 of them before November 11th, 2018. So we decided to have a go!

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Finding the Fallen: The Battle of Gaza exhibition panels tour the county

Following on from The Forum’s Battle of Gaza exhibition in April, there are more chances to view the pop-up exhibition panels as they start their tour of the county – find out more about the exhibition and where to see it below.

The Battle of Gaza touring exhibition marks the centenary of the Second Battle of Gaza on 19 April 1917, in which hundreds of men serving in the Norfolk Regiment fought. It tells the story of how the Territorial Force soldiers were recruited and of their journey from Gallipoli to Gaza. It also demonstrates how the campaign in the Middle East impacted on the Norfolk Regiment.

Officers Mess, 1/5th Battalion, The Norfolk Regiment (Territorial Force) Palestine, 1917. Image courtesy of the Purdy Archive.

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Announcing our 2018 commemoration project

The eagle eyed among our regular blog readers might have spotted that we have added a new page to the blog:

 

This is where you can find all the information regarding how the Norfolkinworldwar1 team are planning to commemorate Armistice Day in 2018.

In short we are asking the people of Norfolk to help us create 15,500 poppies – one for each person commemorated on the county’s war memorials – for us to display in the autumn of 2018.

On this new page you can find all of the important details such as size, where to send them when they are completed along with some pattern ideas for the poppies.

15,500 poppies is a huge number which is why we are starting early but we know that the people of Norfolk (and further away possibly) will get behind our idea and soon desks at the library will resemble a poppy meadow rather than a work space!

Below is a poster about the project – please do share this far and wide – if you’d like it in another format then please just leave a comment here and we’ll get back to you.

Thank you so much in advance for your help,

Sarah and all the Norfolkinworldwar1 team