100 Years On

100 years ago, the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 had just convened with the first of 145 meetings between the statesmen of all sides.

The final peace treaty with Germany, The Treaty of Versailles, was signed on 28th June 1919 but negotiations between other nations continues for a further four years with the Treaty of Lausanne (peace with the former Ottoman Empire) being revised right through until the summer of 1923.

While it would be lovely to continue researching the impact that WW1 had on Norfolk sadly the time has come to stop updating this blog.

Before we go however we thought we would share some of the Norfolk in World War One highlights from the past 5 years:

  • We’ve posted 518 articles since 2013
  • Over 50 different people or organisation have written posts for us, whether this is research into a topic that interests them; family/village history research or reviews of WW1 commemoration projects.
  • 68, 419 people have visited the blog
  • These visitors have come from 153 different countries or territories
  • We launched the 2018 Poppy Plea which saw over 15,500 poppies being made for us to represent the fallen of Norfolk.

We couldn’t have done any of this without you – our readers and contributors – so many thanks for your support and interest over the centenary commemorations.

Norwich, Guildhall Hill, Return of 2nd Norfolks, April 1919. Image from Picture Norfolk, taken by George Swain

In the words of the popular WW1 Song:

Bonsoir, old thing, cheerio chin chin,
Nah-poo, toodle-oo, good-bye-ee

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Armistice Commemorations

With the 100th Anniversary of the Armistice fast approaching we are pleased to be able to share some of the events happening around the county with readers of the blog.

Today we’re letting you know about a concert of music and readings being held at St Andrews Church in Eaton, Norwich which takes place on Saturday 10th November at 7.00pm

Details of price and how to book are on the poster below.


A sneak peak at the programme has been provided and it will include music performed by the whole choir as well as just the male or female members, all of which will be interspersed with appropriate readings.

The full list is below the page cut so if you would rather not know before the concert ‘look away now’ as they say. Continue reading

Outdoor Poppies from the Poppy Plea

Back in the summer we were contacted by Scout Leaders involved in the big NORJAM event.  One of the activities the Scouts could take part in was poppy making – they recycled their drink bottles into wonderful outdoor poppies. After NORJAM they kindly donated the poppies to our appeal – these have been distributed to some of the county’s library gardens and we have just been sent these images.

The garden at Yarmouth has also has just won a Gold Award and been named the overall winner in the community group for the Great Yarmouth and Gorleston in Bloom, 2018.  We are very pleased that they’ve found room for our poppies in their award winning grounds.

NORJAM poppies in Martham Library garden

 

NORJAM poppies in Great Yarmouth Community Garden

 

NORJAM poppies in Great Yarmouth Community Garden

 

NORJAM poppies in Great Yarmouth Community Garden

Commemorating the First World War in Outwell, Norfolk

Dr Charles Nelson, Membership Secretary, Friends of St Clement’s Church, Outwell has been in touch to tell us of a wonderful event held at the church and how to still see some of the work involved.

A spectacular cascade of scarlet, red and  crimson poppies – knitted, crocheted, sewn or needle-felted by members of Welle Women’s Institute and St Clement’s Coffee Shoppers, particularly Elaine Allison, Rebecca Broda, Victoria Brown, Helen Crittle, Sally Harman, Edna Hollands, Margaret Lake, Liz Robson, Ruth Saunders and Linda Shinkin – was “unveiled” on Friday last, 5 October 2018, at St Clement’s Church, Outwell. The cascade of poppies, stitched onto white camouflage webbing, falls from the summit of the staircase in the South Aisle of St Clement’s, and is part of the parish’s commemoration of the centenary of the end of the First World War. The cascade will remain in place until mid-November.
 
The “unveiling” occurred at a very successful concert given by the Upwell Gilbert and Sullivan Choral Society, also a tribute to mark the anniversary.
 
The cascade can be viewed by visitors during the normal Sunday service in St Clement’s, and on Tuesdays when the St Clement’s Coffee Shop is open. [Coffee, tea and cakes are served as well as delicious soup and light lunches. The proceeds from the Coffee Shop go to help keep St Clement’s open for worship.]
 
Other projects currently being supported by the Friends of St Clement’s Church include restoration of some of the antique furniture, including two massive wooden trunks and a fine Jacobean communion table, work funded also by a grant from the Leche Trust. The stabilising and protecting of the splendid mediaeval painted glass, especially that dating from 1420–1440 in the tracery of east window of the Beaupré Chapel in St Clement’s, is also a current project, assisted by the Glaziers Trust.
We thank Dr Nelson for sharing this with us, and also Mr Ashby for taking such lovely photos. If you attended the concert, or you have other WW1 commemoration projects happening, please do let us know.

Unveiling the finished art work

You may remember that just a few days ago we shared the wonderful project being run by the Sprowston Dementia Friendly Community – well they’ve now sent us the pictures of their final art work and we think it is wonderful.

Do remember to send us details of any WW1 projects you are working on so that we can share them with our readers.

 

 

Commemorating the Great War in Norwich

As the 100th Anniversary of the 1918 Armistice approaches we are being told of more commemoration events being held here in the city.

The Castle Museum is holding an exhibition called “Armistice: Legacy of the Great War in Norfolk” which opens on Saturday 20th October and runs until 6th January 2019.  The new Castle brochure which can be picked up in the Norwich Forum and at Tourist Information Offices (as well as many other county locations) is full of event listings supporting this exhibition – and regular blog readers may spot some familiar names and themes!

In addition to this wonderful exhibition, The Forum in Norwich is also holding a building wide, free exhibition between the 1st and 13th November.  Continue reading

New beginnings post war

1918 was a year that was full of fighting and death – either on the battle fields or from ‘flu – and while it is important to mark the end of the fighting with the signing of the Armistice on 11th November it is also good to remember that December 1918 saw the culmination of another struggle when (some) women and all men aged over 21 gained the right to vote in UK elections.

While the campaign for women’s votes had been put on hold during the war we can’t say the same for projects looking in to the Suffrage and Suffragette movements and we’ve just been told about an exciting day of events looking at just this issue taking place on Saturday 13th October:

‘Suffragette Stories: Exploring the Legacy’

‘Suffragette Stories: Exploring the Legacy’ is a free evening of talks open to all on Saturday, 13th October, 5-7.30pm in the Auditorium of the Forum in Norwich.

It marks the date that the ‘Votes for Women’ banner was first raised at the Free Trade Hall in 1905 by Annie Kenny. Talks and discussion will throw light on the struggle against inequality of little known activists like the Kenney sisters, celebrate the achievement of voting rights for women (over the age of thirty), and consider the uneven progress of gender relations since.

Join us to hear from leading historians Krista Cowman and Lyndsey Jenkins as well as UEA Archive’s very own Writer in Residence, Fiona Sinclair, who will be reporting on the activities of ‘Suffragette Stories’ HLF project so far. Listen, reflect, and take part in the questions and discussion afterwards. All welcome!

Tickets to this event are free and can be booked here.