Following up on a recent post and call for help.

Following on from our recent post asking for help identifying a ‘mystery man’ on the Hellesdon War Memorial we’ve had lots of people share information with us and we are now pretty certain that we have identified the Piercy mentioned on the memorial.

All respondents are certain that the name has been miss-copied or miss transcribed at some point and that it should read William J(ohn) Piercy and not William H Piercy.

More detailed research shared with us by historian and author Steve Smith shows that he was born in Hackford in Norfolk and that he enlisted in Norwich on 9th May 1915 initially with the 1/6th Norfolk Cyclist Battalion, he was 19 ½ at the time of enlisting.

He was sent overseas on the 27th July 1916 (missing the start of the Battle of the Somme) and joined the 8th Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment on the 10th August 1916. We are lucky that his full service records survived the air raids of the 2nd World War  and we can trace his progress through the war as he moved to the 9th Battalion and then the 1st Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment.

His record card states that he was wounded in October 1916 and on looking through the Norfolk Regiment Casualty Book, held at the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum, this can be deciphered so we know that in October 1916 he was suffered gunshot wounds to his lower extremities and was evacuated back to the Military Hospital in Devonport. He stayed in the UK until August 1917 when he once more returned to service overseas, and was back at the Front by 10th September 1917.

He is listed as being Killed in Action on 29th May 1918 and is commemorated on Panel 3 of the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium.

To tell the story of his final day Steve has also found the Battalion War Diary for 29th May 1918 so that we can see what he faced.The internet became a truly magical place at this point when we were contacted by a family member of the Piercy’s former neighbours and so we can share that here too as it gives a flavour to the lives of people living in Norfolk at the time.

Once more a huge thanks to all our readers who have added so much more to this man’s story.

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Images from the Archives

Middlesex hussars at Aylsham 2 1915 by Searson postcard

‘The Trenches’ or Middlesex Hussars practicing trench digging at Aylsham  (probably Blickling Estate) in 1915. 

This is just one of several hundred newly digitised original photographs, posters and notices connected with the First World War in Norfolk. The material is held in the collections of the Norfolk Heritage Centre, Norfolk Record Office and Norfolk Museums Service. Over the course of the next few years the images will be posted on http://www.picture.norfolk.gov.uk/ (the online picture archive run by Norfolk County Council Library and Information Service).

Update on our Poppy Project from King’s Lynn

We are really touched by just how many people are responding to our Poppy Plea, and how it is encouraging people to connect with the history of their local areas. Today’s update comes from King’s Lynn.

Barbara from All Saints Church in Hillington Square, King’s Lynn writes:

Members of the congregation of the Church I attend, All Saint’, Hillington Square, King’s  Lynn  (http://www.allsaintskingslynn.org.uk/) were impressed to hear about your Project.  

We decided to produce a poppy for each life lost from our Parish, whose name is engraved on the memorial window in the Church, 169 in total.  

The response has been amazing and people were very keen to participate. We have made 220 poppies in total.  

The poppies are displayed on a board within the church and there are exactly 169 poppies within the Crucifix itself.

Barbara and her fellow knitters have also said that this memorial to the fallen of their Parish will stay on display until the end of September and then they are very kindly going to send all 220 poppies into our bigger project to contribute to our countywide memorial.

Thanks to Barbara for sharing this story with us. If you would like to make a poppy or 2 for our project then you can find all of the details here and please do let us know of any of your own Armistice 100 projects.

Remembering Stanley Sadler

With many thanks to the Wood Norton Remembers project for this post, As ever if you or your local history group have any research to share please do get in touch.

Stanley Sadler was born in Ridlington on the 19th February 1898, the fourth son of Robert and Rebecca Sadler’s ten children.[1]

Stanley enlisted in the Royal Navy on the 26th October 1916, for the ‘hostilities’, as his card records.  He gave his place of birth as North Walsham (which is about 5 miles from Ridlington), and his occupation as blacksmith.  From the 26th October 1916 to the 30th March 1917 he was a Stoker (2nd class) and based at Pembroke II, a shore establishment at Sheerness.  On the 31st March 1917 he moved to HMS Hibernia (based at Sheerness) and remained there until the 15th October 1917, when Hibernia was moved to Chatham Dockyard as an overflow accommodation ship.   Stanley had been promoted to Stoker 1st class on the 19th July 1917.  He returned to Pembroke II until the 27th December 1917, when he was moved to HMS Dido (a depot ship), from where he joined HMS Scott (see Figure 1).

HMS Scott was the first of a new destroyer class built to be flotilla leaders for the V- and W- class destroyers.  She was launched on the 18th October 1917, but less than a year after entering service she was sunk off the Dutch coast on the 15th August 1918.  It is assumed that a German U-boat torpedoed her, but it is also possible that she hit a mine (the R-class destroyer HMS Ulleswater sank in the same incident).  The German submarine U-71 which had been patrolling and mining the area is usually credited with Scott’s sinking. The wreck of HMS Scott lies approximately 20 nautical miles (23 miles) off the Dutch coast, lying upright with the stern in 35 metres (115 ft) of water, and the bow in 28 metres (92 ft).[2]

Figure 1 : HMS Scott

The Naval records for Stanley record that his widow, Agnes, was informed of his death on the 16th August 1918, and the address on the record is given as 8 Langthorne Street, Stratford (East London).[3]

Stanley is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, which records those members of the Royal Navy who died in WW1 (and WW2) and have no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided; 8,517 sailors of the First World War are commemorated on the memorial.

Further research in Stanley’s family reveals that his father, Robert Sadler, was born on the 8th August 1865 in Honing, the son of James and Hannah Sadler, and baptised on the 22nd August 1869, in Honing parish church.[4]  Robert married Rebecca Bacon in 1893.[5]  She was born in Honing in 1872,[6] the daughter of Charles and Mary Bacon.[7]  In 1901, Charles and Mary Bacon were living at Raw Hall, Wood Norton; Charles was a farmer.[8]  He died in 1901, aged 70, and is buried in Wood Norton.[9]  Mary Bacon continued to live at Raw Hall with her son Robert John Bacon and his family.[10]  Robert Sadler died in 1922, aged 56, and is buried in Wood Norton.[11]  Rebecca Sadler died in 1955, aged 82, in Hoxne, Suffolk, but is buried in Wood Norton.[12]

In the 1911 Census for Tunstead records Robert (a farm labourer) and Rebecca Sadler with nine children:

Name Born  Died
George c.1895, Honing.[13]

In the 1911 census, George is aged 16, and a farm labourer.

19th February 1916, aged 20, Carlton, New York, USA.[14]
Fred 14th October 1895, Ridlington.[15]

In the 1911 census, Fred is aged 15, and a farm labourer.  Fred married Anna Tebble in July 1916 in Wood Norton (Stanley Sadler was a witness), and he served in WW1.[16]

1974, aged 79, Essex.[17]
Robert 1896, Ridlington.[18]

In the 1911 census, Robert is aged 14, and a farm labourer.

1912, aged 16.[19]
Stanley 19th February 1898, Ridlington.

In the 1911 census, Stanley is aged 13, and a farm labourer.

15th August 1918, the Dutch coast.
Arthur 4th June 1899, Ridlington.[20]

In the 1911 census, Arthur is aged 11, and at school.  He served with the Royal Navy in WW1, and married Ivy Alice Pointen in October 1929 in Wood Norton.[21]

1985, aged 85, Norwich.[22]
Edward 1901, Salhouse.[23]

In the 1911 census, Edward is aged 9, and at school.  Edward served with the Royal Marine Light Infantry Division in WW1, and emigrated to Australia in 1922.[24]

1976, aged 75, Australia.[25]
Elsie Mary 1903, Salhouse.[26]

In the 1911 census, Elsie is aged 7, and at school.  She married George Bacon in 1924.[27]

1982, aged 79, Suffolk.[28]
Sidney 1905, Tunstead.[29]

In the 1911 census, Sidney is aged 5.  He spent time working in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s.[30]

Charles 1907, Tunstead.[31]

In the 1911 census, Charles is aged 3.

1993, aged 85.[32]

Their last child, Herbert William Sadler, was born on the 30th August 1912.[33]  He married  Gladys M. Warnes in 1937.[34]  Herbert died in 2011, in Fakenham, aged 99.[35]

Fred, Arthur and Edward Sadler are all commemorated on the war memorial in All Saints, Wood Norton, which records the servicemen who served and died, as well as those who survived, the WW1 conflict.  Stanley Sadler’s name also appears on the war memorial at Bawdeswell, church (approximately 6 miles from Wood Norton), but the link with Bawdeswell is not yet known.

We have been fortunate to be able to contact Stanley Sadler’s relatives, who have provided us with information on the Sadler family, including photographs of Stanley and his wife (see Figure 2), and his Memorial Plaque (see Figure 3).

Figure 2 : Stanley Sadler and his wife, Agnes.
The hat band bears the name HMS Scott.

Figure 3 : Stanley Sadler’s Memorial Plaque

[1] UK, Royal Navy Register of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); UK, British Army and Navy Birth, Marriages and Death Records, 1730-1960 (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1898, Smallburgh Vol.4b, p65 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[2] Wikipedia, HMS Scott (1917) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Scott_(1917)); Wrecksite, HMS Scott +1918 (https://wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?4880)

[3] UK, British Army and Navy Birth, Marriages and Death Records, 1730-1960 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[4] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1865, Tunstead, Vol.4b, p.45 (www.freebmd.org.uk); 1911 census, Tunstead (Schedule 47) (www.ancestry.co.uk); Baptisms, Horning, 1869 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[5] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1893, Smallburgh Vol.4b, p105 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[6] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1872, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p51 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[7] 1881 census, Honing (p.12) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[8] 1901 census, Wood Norton (p.1) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[9] Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Burials, 1901 (p.130)

[10] 1911 census Wood Norton (Schedule 195) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[11] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1922, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.120 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Burials, 1922 (p.131)

[12] Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1898 (p.132)

[13] 1911 census, Tunstead (Schedule 47) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[14] U.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-current (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[15] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1985, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.56 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[16] UK, Royal Marines Registers of Services Index, 1842-1925 (www.ancestry.co.uk); War Memorial, All Saints, Wood Norton

[17] England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[18] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1896, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.64 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[19] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1912, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.316 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[20] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1899, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.65 (www.freebmd.org.uk); UK, Royal Navy Registers of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[21] UK, Royal Navy Registers of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1929, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.253 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1916 (p.105)

[22] England and Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966, 1973-1995 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[23] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1901, St. Faiths, Vol.4b, p.105 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[24] UK, Royal Marines Registers of Services Index, 1842-1925 (www.ancestry.co.uk); Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839-1923 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[25] Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[26] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1903, St. Faiths, Vol.4b, p.97 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[27] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1924, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.626 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[28] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1982, Ipswich, Vol.10, p.2308 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[29] England and Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915, Quarter to December 1905, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.50 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[30] Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[31] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1907, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.49 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[32] England and Wales, Death Index, 1916-2005, Registration August 1993, North Walsham,

[33] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1912, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.150 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Death Index, 2007-2015 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[34] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1937, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.639 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[35] England and Wales, Death Index, 2007-2015 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

Images from the Archives

CASSERETTO

A 1914 cartoon from a Casseretto/Winter family notebook (family members worked in local weaving and brush-making industries during the 19th century). This is just one of several hundred newly digitised original photographs, posters and notices connected with the First World War in Norfolk. The material is held in the collections of the Norfolk Heritage Centre, Norfolk Record Office and Norfolk Museums Service. Over the course of the next few years the images will be posted on http://www.picture.norfolk.gov.uk/ (the  picture archive run by Norfolk County Council Library and Information Service).

World War One Commemoration Events in Hemblington

Here at the Norfolkinworldwar1 blog we’ve been contacted by the parish team and Friends of Hemblington Church about their forthcoming events.  They also have opportunities for others to share research and stories…

The parish team and The Friends of All Saints Church will be commemorating the ending of the First World War at Hemblington church, with an exhibition over several weeks in August, September and November.

We are aware that many organisations nationally are planning to hold exhibitions and in order to make this an event to commemorate local people who fought and died in the conflict, we will be exhibiting information about the people listed on the memorial in the church, as well as a display about the Battle of The Somme, which claimed the lives of many Norfolk men.

Earlier in the summer local children will have made a collage illustrating their understanding of war – and peace – which will form a part of the exhibition. We should therefore like to invite local groups to join us on the afternoon of Saturday, 15th September, both as guests for afternoon tea and also to participate if they so wish.

If you or any people in your society:
 have memories or stories of family members involved in the war, either at the front or supporting the war effort at home
 have family heirlooms/souvenirs from the time (perhaps postcards, letters, medals)
 might be willing to read a poem or prose reading about the First World War and / or the Armistice

we should love to hear from them. Personal reminiscences are so important and throw a light on how people coped during and after the war, though we do understand that they are likely to be three or even four generations removed now.

If you or your members would like to learn more about this event, please get in touch with Catherine (01603) 270 360 or Lynda (01603) 713 597 or Sue (01603) 715 804 or email hemblington@gmail.com

 

The Hemblington team have lots of events planned and it all sounds great. If you can’t help or visit Hemblington but you have your own events you’d like to share please do just drop us a line at norfolkinworldwar1@gmail.com.

Images from the Archives

30129037812956

Letheringsett, Glavenside House, soldiers and Red Cross nurses during the First World War.

This image forms part of Gressenhall Museum’s photographic collections and is just one of several hundred newly digitised original photographs, posters and notices connected with the First World War in Norfolk. The material is held in the collections of the Norfolk Heritage Centre, Norfolk Record Office and Norfolk Museums Service. Over the course of the next few years the images will be posted on http://www.picture.norfolk.gov.uk/ (the online picture archive run by Norfolk County Council Library and Information Service).