A Thetford Man’s War

We’ve recently been contacted by a blog reader who let us know about a wonderful website his son has created charting the war of John Locke from Thetford:

Jack in uniform

 http://wardiary.novawebs.co.uk/index.html

The website creator (and John’s great-grandson) says

The website features a transcript of the war diary of Jack Lock, a soldier who fought in World War One with the 4th Battalion Norfolk Regiment. The diary covers his time during the Gallipoli Campaign and he records, in vivid detail, his first experiences of war during that chaotic conflict. The site also features scans of the diary, a biography and several photographs.

Bugle Boy

John ‘Jack’ Locke in later life

As a team we’ve spent hours reading through this treasure and we hope that you all enjoy it too!

If you have a similar project or family story to tell please do drop us a line on norfolkinworldwar1@gmail.com and we’ll do our very best to feature it here!

Mummy, what did you do in the Great War?

Norfolk Women in the First World War – a call for stories

The Forum, Norwich recently contacted us to see if we could help them with their next First World War project.

The Forum, Norwich, is appealing for people to share their stories and memories of Norfolk women in the First World War who were either on active service or remaining strong on the Norfolk home-front.

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The Mystery of a Military Cross Award.

On the Norfolk Regiment pages of this blog a conversation has been taking place regarding a one of the regiment’s own but that has subsequently thrown up more questions than answers…

One of our readers has restored a trench watch that belonged to Captain R B Caton of the 4th and contacted us to see if we could help him fill in some of the details relating to Cpt. Caton.

Captain Caton

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William Conway Thomas: “Everything Was Influenced by the War.”

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William Conway Thomas

Last week we featured the story of Arthur Smith, who had taken part in Norfolk Libraries’ Historypin Connections project and shared his memories of Norwich after the First World War. This week we are looking at the life story of William Conway Thomas who, like Arthur, was born in 1917 but grew up in Swansea, Wales. William first shared his memories with Historypin project coordinator Rachel Willis in 2016 on his local mobile library, which William visits regularly to pick up a new selection of audio books.

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Arthur Smith: Remembering Norwich after the First World War

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Norfolk Libraries have taken part in the national Historypin Connections project during 2016 – 2017, to reach out to isolated older people and record their memories for inclusion in an online community archive. As part of this project a team of volunteers met with older people across the county, spending time listening to stories, looking at photographs, and putting together a record of their life experiences.

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Recording the Weather in WW1 – a Norfolk connection

Past articles here on the blog have talked about the weather during World War One, most recently in February 2017. While these posts have been indulging in a personal interest  and myth busting one of our regular readers and contributers has actually found a WW1 link to both the weather and Norfolk!

John Henry Willis

Norwich Meteorologist, Naturalist, Writer, and Inventor

We are indebted to Carey Pallister of Victoria, British Columbia, a descendant of Edgar C. Willis, the younger brother of John Henry Willis and his wife, Jenny Russell Currie. Her interest in this posting has been very supportive; she has provided much useful information including a family tree, as well as invaluable family photographs expertly scanned.

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Captivity in Turkey: from the diaries of Lieutenant Colonel Francis Cecil Lodge Part 2: January-December 1917

The Norfolk Regiment in Mesopotamia

Captivity in Turkey: from the diaries of Lieutenant Colonel Francis Cecil Lodge

 January – June 1917

This is a continuation of the postings of 16 November, 2016 and 26 May, 2017. Some entries have been omitted if they are unduly repetitious, or where they contain financial details other than about pay or refer to private family matters. The diaries are held in the archives of the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum.

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