Remembering Stanley Sadler

With many thanks to the Wood Norton Remembers project for this post, As ever if you or your local history group have any research to share please do get in touch.

Stanley Sadler was born in Ridlington on the 19th February 1898, the fourth son of Robert and Rebecca Sadler’s ten children.[1]

Stanley enlisted in the Royal Navy on the 26th October 1916, for the ‘hostilities’, as his card records.  He gave his place of birth as North Walsham (which is about 5 miles from Ridlington), and his occupation as blacksmith.  From the 26th October 1916 to the 30th March 1917 he was a Stoker (2nd class) and based at Pembroke II, a shore establishment at Sheerness.  On the 31st March 1917 he moved to HMS Hibernia (based at Sheerness) and remained there until the 15th October 1917, when Hibernia was moved to Chatham Dockyard as an overflow accommodation ship.   Stanley had been promoted to Stoker 1st class on the 19th July 1917.  He returned to Pembroke II until the 27th December 1917, when he was moved to HMS Dido (a depot ship), from where he joined HMS Scott (see Figure 1).

HMS Scott was the first of a new destroyer class built to be flotilla leaders for the V- and W- class destroyers.  She was launched on the 18th October 1917, but less than a year after entering service she was sunk off the Dutch coast on the 15th August 1918.  It is assumed that a German U-boat torpedoed her, but it is also possible that she hit a mine (the R-class destroyer HMS Ulleswater sank in the same incident).  The German submarine U-71 which had been patrolling and mining the area is usually credited with Scott’s sinking. The wreck of HMS Scott lies approximately 20 nautical miles (23 miles) off the Dutch coast, lying upright with the stern in 35 metres (115 ft) of water, and the bow in 28 metres (92 ft).[2]

Figure 1 : HMS Scott

The Naval records for Stanley record that his widow, Agnes, was informed of his death on the 16th August 1918, and the address on the record is given as 8 Langthorne Street, Stratford (East London).[3]

Stanley is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, which records those members of the Royal Navy who died in WW1 (and WW2) and have no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided; 8,517 sailors of the First World War are commemorated on the memorial.

Further research in Stanley’s family reveals that his father, Robert Sadler, was born on the 8th August 1865 in Honing, the son of James and Hannah Sadler, and baptised on the 22nd August 1869, in Honing parish church.[4]  Robert married Rebecca Bacon in 1893.[5]  She was born in Honing in 1872,[6] the daughter of Charles and Mary Bacon.[7]  In 1901, Charles and Mary Bacon were living at Raw Hall, Wood Norton; Charles was a farmer.[8]  He died in 1901, aged 70, and is buried in Wood Norton.[9]  Mary Bacon continued to live at Raw Hall with her son Robert John Bacon and his family.[10]  Robert Sadler died in 1922, aged 56, and is buried in Wood Norton.[11]  Rebecca Sadler died in 1955, aged 82, in Hoxne, Suffolk, but is buried in Wood Norton.[12]

In the 1911 Census for Tunstead records Robert (a farm labourer) and Rebecca Sadler with nine children:

Name Born  Died
George c.1895, Honing.[13]

In the 1911 census, George is aged 16, and a farm labourer.

19th February 1916, aged 20, Carlton, New York, USA.[14]
Fred 14th October 1895, Ridlington.[15]

In the 1911 census, Fred is aged 15, and a farm labourer.  Fred married Anna Tebble in July 1916 in Wood Norton (Stanley Sadler was a witness), and he served in WW1.[16]

1974, aged 79, Essex.[17]
Robert 1896, Ridlington.[18]

In the 1911 census, Robert is aged 14, and a farm labourer.

1912, aged 16.[19]
Stanley 19th February 1898, Ridlington.

In the 1911 census, Stanley is aged 13, and a farm labourer.

15th August 1918, the Dutch coast.
Arthur 4th June 1899, Ridlington.[20]

In the 1911 census, Arthur is aged 11, and at school.  He served with the Royal Navy in WW1, and married Ivy Alice Pointen in October 1929 in Wood Norton.[21]

1985, aged 85, Norwich.[22]
Edward 1901, Salhouse.[23]

In the 1911 census, Edward is aged 9, and at school.  Edward served with the Royal Marine Light Infantry Division in WW1, and emigrated to Australia in 1922.[24]

1976, aged 75, Australia.[25]
Elsie Mary 1903, Salhouse.[26]

In the 1911 census, Elsie is aged 7, and at school.  She married George Bacon in 1924.[27]

1982, aged 79, Suffolk.[28]
Sidney 1905, Tunstead.[29]

In the 1911 census, Sidney is aged 5.  He spent time working in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s.[30]

Charles 1907, Tunstead.[31]

In the 1911 census, Charles is aged 3.

1993, aged 85.[32]

Their last child, Herbert William Sadler, was born on the 30th August 1912.[33]  He married  Gladys M. Warnes in 1937.[34]  Herbert died in 2011, in Fakenham, aged 99.[35]

Fred, Arthur and Edward Sadler are all commemorated on the war memorial in All Saints, Wood Norton, which records the servicemen who served and died, as well as those who survived, the WW1 conflict.  Stanley Sadler’s name also appears on the war memorial at Bawdeswell, church (approximately 6 miles from Wood Norton), but the link with Bawdeswell is not yet known.

We have been fortunate to be able to contact Stanley Sadler’s relatives, who have provided us with information on the Sadler family, including photographs of Stanley and his wife (see Figure 2), and his Memorial Plaque (see Figure 3).

Figure 2 : Stanley Sadler and his wife, Agnes.
The hat band bears the name HMS Scott.

Figure 3 : Stanley Sadler’s Memorial Plaque

[1] UK, Royal Navy Register of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); UK, British Army and Navy Birth, Marriages and Death Records, 1730-1960 (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1898, Smallburgh Vol.4b, p65 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[2] Wikipedia, HMS Scott (1917) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Scott_(1917)); Wrecksite, HMS Scott +1918 (https://wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?4880)

[3] UK, British Army and Navy Birth, Marriages and Death Records, 1730-1960 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[4] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1865, Tunstead, Vol.4b, p.45 (www.freebmd.org.uk); 1911 census, Tunstead (Schedule 47) (www.ancestry.co.uk); Baptisms, Horning, 1869 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[5] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1893, Smallburgh Vol.4b, p105 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[6] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1872, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p51 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[7] 1881 census, Honing (p.12) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[8] 1901 census, Wood Norton (p.1) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[9] Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Burials, 1901 (p.130)

[10] 1911 census Wood Norton (Schedule 195) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[11] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1922, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.120 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Burials, 1922 (p.131)

[12] Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1898 (p.132)

[13] 1911 census, Tunstead (Schedule 47) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[14] U.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-current (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[15] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1985, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.56 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[16] UK, Royal Marines Registers of Services Index, 1842-1925 (www.ancestry.co.uk); War Memorial, All Saints, Wood Norton

[17] England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[18] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1896, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.64 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[19] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1912, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.316 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[20] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1899, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.65 (www.freebmd.org.uk); UK, Royal Navy Registers of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[21] UK, Royal Navy Registers of Seamen’s Services, 1848-1939 (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1929, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.253 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1916 (p.105)

[22] England and Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966, 1973-1995 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[23] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1901, St. Faiths, Vol.4b, p.105 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[24] UK, Royal Marines Registers of Services Index, 1842-1925 (www.ancestry.co.uk); Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839-1923 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[25] Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[26] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1903, St. Faiths, Vol.4b, p.97 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[27] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1924, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.626 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[28] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1982, Ipswich, Vol.10, p.2308 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[29] England and Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915, Quarter to December 1905, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.50 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[30] Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[31] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1907, Smallburgh, Vol.4b, p.49 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[32] England and Wales, Death Index, 1916-2005, Registration August 1993, North Walsham,

[33] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1912, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.150 (www.freebmd.org.uk); England and Wales, Death Index, 2007-2015 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[34] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1937, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.639 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[35] England and Wales, Death Index, 2007-2015 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

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A Hellesdon War Memorial Mystery

Our project to create a poppy for every name listed on the county’s war memorials has sparked a lot of interest and has also thrown up some interesting queries…

We’ve recently been talking on Twitter with Linda, a lady who has undertaken to create a poppy for all of the men listed on the Hellesdon War Memorial. More than this Linda is also researching the war history of all 15 men remembered there.

A recent image of Hellesdon War Memorial

Linda has made the fourteen poppies, and researched in to thirteen of the men but there is a real mystery surrounding the last man…

The soldier concerned is recorded on the memorial as William H Piercy but I can find no record of him in any records.

I have however found a William John Piercy who’s next of kin were living at Lower Hellesdon. 

I have been doing the research as part of the Hellesdon Community History Group and I’m stuck – could you forward this query on to anyone that can help guide me in the right direct to resolve this quandary.   

I think it is a transcription/typo error which I have had personal experience of within my own family.

We’ve done a little sleuthing by playing around with various spellings of the name and the initials on the Commonwealth War Graves website and found three possible men that could possibly be the man listed at Hellesdon.

Gunner W R Piercy #74009 whose parents are listed as living on Dereham Rd, Norwich

W J Piercy #43703 whose parents are listed as living in Eccles.

William Piercy #G/16306 but with no further details.

And this is where we call on your expertise – can anyone help Linda, as she says

His name would have been submitted to a “committee” for approval and I wonder where this would be and this record would have more information to help confirm his parents/date of birth etc. 

As ever if you can help with this query please leave a comment here / email norfolkinworldwar1@gmail.com or Tweet us @Norfolkinww1

This Was Not To Be His Final Curtain

We’ve recently been contacted by Ray from Mattishall who has shared a fascinating story about a local man who has faded from memory since the First World War, despite is high profile at the time.

This was not to be his final curtain: Frank Henry Norman Wrighton

Frank Henry Norman Wrighton
1879 – 1917

Friday, November 2nd 1917 – My journey looking for First World War casualties had brought me to the picturesque seaside town of Torquay, Devon, many miles from the battle fields of the Western Front. A thin and wasted 38-year-old man had finally succumbed to an affliction he had acquired during his military service. Katherine Peacock, the Matron of St Barnabas Nursing Home for the Incurables, was recorded as being present. No records have been found to confirm there was any effort to return his remains to his home village of Mattishall Burgh, Norfolk although on his death certificate an address of 45 Warwick Road, Warwick Gardens, London was written, a large building where he or his wife could have been renting a room, whilst working in the capital. There was a war on and any transportation of a corpse would have involved considerable expense which from all accounts show there was little funds available. Four days later on November 6th he was taken the short trip to Torquay cemetery and after a simple service lowered into a common grave, a grave we now know he shares with four other men. His death was not the result of battle wounds but a condition brought on and worsened during his short military service. His death certificate, records him as ‘FRANK HENRY WRIGHTON’, age 38, an Actor. A simple note on his service records reads “He was well till a year ago, then had Pleurisy and Pneumonia, following wet exposure”. TB was also found in his Sputum.

I had been researching this man for a few years and on discovering this I was left quite emotional. There was no record of him on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, even though the army had been paying and caring for him since his discharge. How had this man just been forgotten? I had got to know him well, my research had found he had been such a character, or being an actor, multiple characters! He was very patriotic, had a great spirit of determination and given a lot so ending up forgotten, in a common grave did not do him justice. Continue reading

The Norfolk Regiment in Mesopotamia

After a well deserved rest (and undertaking more research) our Mesopotamian correspondent is back with the further experiences of the Norfolk Regiment’s officers during their captivity in Mesopotamia. 

Captivity in Turkey: from the diaries of Lieutenant Colonel Francis Cecil Lodge

Part 3: 1918

This is a continuation of the postings of 16 November, 2016, 26 May, 2017 and 16 June, 1917. Some entries have been omitted if they are unduly repetitious, or where they contain financial details other than about pay or refer to private family matters. The diaries are held in the archives of the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum.

After being transferred from captivity at Yozgad (Yozgat), Lodge had arrived at Afion Kara Hissar (Afyonkarahisar) on 1st November 1817. It is at this place that his diaries continue.

The book into which F.C. Lodge transcribed his written journal
Source: Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum

 

1st January, 1918

Rain during the night, with snow in the morning – dull.

2nd January, 1918

Paid Julius 12 liras for messing – dull.

3rd, 4th, 5th January, 1918

All dull days, and more snow on Friday night [4th-5th].

6th January, 1918

Brighter and freezing 11° [F.]. Recd. 5 liras Embassy Money. Letter from Robert Berry d/ 27 Oct and post card from M. [his wife, Margaret] d/ 25 Oct.

7th January, 1918

Posted letter 63 to M. – Capt. Berry – Mrs Kerr

10 officers p of w arrived early this morning from Palestine Front. One of them, Gardiner, had been in our first Bn. We moved into a new house today. I have now a small room to myself. Still bitterly cold 18° [F.] of frost.

8th January, 1918

Freezing hard 7° of frost during the night. Thomas lies with us now.

9th January, 1918

They have stopped our bread ration from gov. [government] supply. We now have to buy it in the bazaar at 8½ ps [piastres] a loaf instead of 2½. A splendid thaw, it is now quite mild.

10th, 11th, 12th January, 1918

Milder. We hear that they are going to reduce our pay. This will make living all the harder – even now it’s impossible to exist on what we get.; this has been supplemented by private income.

Made 2 beds – one for L/Cp Swift and the other for Wigger.[their orderlies]

Wrote letter 64 to M – and to Genl Mariott & Richardson.

13th, 14th, 15th January, 1918

Fine bright weather with frosts ar night & early morning. Philpot R.F.C. Who arrived here sick with dysentery, died and was buried today.

16th January, 1918

We had 3 shocks of an earthquake during breakfast – 3 at dinner & 2 during the night. Some were strong & shook our house considerably.

Post card d/ 12th Nov. from M.

17th January, 1918

Fine & sharp. Letter from Robert [his 3-year-old son] d/ 13th Dec.

18th, 19th, January, 1918

Both days bright & frosty.

Two letters from M. 89 & 91 d/ 9th 14th Nov.

Letter from Mother 31st Oct.2 letters from Ethel d/ 28 Sept 6th Nov.

Letter from Mrs. Bryans [his mother-in-law] d/ 28 Sept

Co. Wilson, Father Mullen, & Foster left after dinner for Stamboul [Constantinople / Istanbul] all are unfit & hope to be discharged.

20th January, 1918

Misty & raw. Another mail in.

2 letters & 1 p.c. from M d/ 4 Oct. 24 Nov., et al

21st January, 1918

Still misty and beastly cold. Wrote 65 [to M]. Also to Mother & Mrs. Bryans [his mother-in-law]

22nd, 23rd, 24th January, 1918

All misty days, except on Tues. the sun came out after lunch.

25th January, 1918

Misty cold. Stace R.E. Came to live with us in Col. Wilson’s place

2 letters from M. 77 & 84 d/28th Sept. & 21st Oct, et al

26th January, 1918

Began to snow again this morning – it is milder.

27th January, 1918

Bright intervals, milder: but walking in the street very muddy.

7 letters from M. & 1 containing snapshots of the kiddies, etc., et al

Julius had a splendid batch of clothing parcels: he gave me a blanket, 2 shirts, 2 towels, 3 pr. of socks, 2 pr. pyjamas & a pair of shoes.

28th January, 1918

Bright & frosty. The 4 Frenchmen who were sent to Stamboul for exchange all returned this morning.

Wrote 66 to M – Evelyn – Mrs Daunt.

29th January, 1918

Parcels given out this morning – I got 8.

  1. Old green suit
  2. Gumboots, shirts, socks, medicines, tie
  3. 1lb. 3 Nunns tobacco & pipe.

4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Food Fortnum & Mason

These arrived in the nick of time, & were most welcome. A shell from Cecilia [his daughter, twin to Robert]. Went to watch a rugger match.

30th January, 1918

Fine & bright, only a slight frost.

Received money for a £10 cheque I had signed some weeks ago. It was paid through the American Express Coy – really a German company*, I only got 1128 ps a pretty good swindle considering the real rate of exchange. Had tea with Trelson [?] R.F.C.

Continue reading

Remembering a man from the Norfolk Battalion

Mr Foreman has recently been in touch with us here at Norfolkinworldwar1.org with both some information about his family’s service during the First World War and also to ask if anyone can help fill in some of the blanks as he starts his journey in to family history research.

I am Robert Dennis Foreman and I was wondering if you were interested in the story of my 2nd Great Uncle William George Foreman who was born in April 1884 in Blo Norton Norfolk and who died on 7th Nov 1916 in Basra; and also in his brother’s (my Great Grandfather Dennis) war?

William Foreman was part of the 2nd Norfolk Battalion and Dennis (1881 – 1966) was in the RAMC as a despatch rider. Dennis was also born in Blo Norton to John Foreman and Harriet Foreman (nee Ayers) but moved to Simonstone in Lancahsire to work on the Huntroyde Farm estate of Nicolas Le Gendre Starkie who was a wealthy landowner here.

My Great-Grandfather lived after being taken prisoner in Cassel after what looked to be a harrowing war experience but sadly my 2nd Great Uncle was not so fortunate.

He was taken prisoner on April 29th 1916 in Kut-el-Amara (in the Siege of Kut) when the battalion was forced to march to Aleppo. Many men died along the way but William survived this march – only to die of malaria according to his record. His regiment number was 8013 and he rose to the rank of Sergeant. Dennis Foreman’s Regimental Number was 103030 and he became a Lance Corporal.

There are 2 letters existing in William’s file where his mother (my 2nd times Great-Grandmother Harriett Ayers 1854 -1931) pleaded with the War Office to let her know what had happened to her son. They are heartfelt as shortly after she penned the letters it became known he had died while a prisoner. In these documents someone has written on the soldier’s small book DEAD in red pen and this was sent to my grandmother with a report stated there was no grave and therefore she couldn’t visit if she wanted to and was able. (Some research on the Commonwealth War Graves site tells us that W.G. Foreman is commemorated on panel 10 of the Basra War Memorial, along with 40,639 other names )

While I do have a picture of my Great-Grandfather Dennis, I sadly have no picture of William and I would dearly like to have one if anyone reading this can help?

Dennis Foreman

Some further research into William’s life and death has shown a discrepancy into cause of death. The Norfolk Regiment Casualty book records William as dying of dysentery not malaria and Robert and the Norfolkinww1 team are wondering which is most likely to be accurate…

Remembering Arthur Robert Buck

With many thanks to the Wood Norton Remembers project for this post. As ever if you or your local history group has any research to share please do get in touch.

Arthur Robert Buck was born on the 2nd May 1878, the youngest son of Robert and Elizabeth Buck, and was baptised on the 19th May 1878 in Stibbard parish church.

Figure 1: Extract from the Stibbard Baptisms Register, 1878

The British Army WW1 Service records 1914-1920 do not appear to have survived for Arthur, but from the extant records it can be seen that Arthur was serving with the Bedfordshire Regiment  when he was killed in 1918 (see Figure 2).[1]

Figure 2: Medal Roll Index Card
for Arthur Buck

Arthur died during the Somme conflict in May 1918, and the war diary for the 4th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment indicates that this was at Forceville, in Picardy.[2]  The diary records that on the 25th May 1918, amongst the officers and men killed or wounded, there were

6 OR’s Killed, 11 OR’s missing, 31 OR’s wounded, 1 gassed

Arthur’s Record of Soldiers’ Effects notes 25.3.18 Death Presumed France.  An amount of £14 9s 6d, including a war gratuity of £12 10s, was paid to his sister, Jane (as sole legatee), in 1919.[3]

Arthur is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial (see Figure 3).  The memorial relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918, when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory which began on 8th August 1918.  It commemorates over 14,300 casualties of the United Kingdom and South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21st March to 7th August 1918.[4]

Figure 3: Pozieres Memorial – Arthur Buck
(reproduced by kind permission of the Buck family)

There is a memorial to Arthur on the headstone for his niece, Alice, in Wood Norton churchyard (she died on the 25th February 1919, aged 26).  The inscription reads:

Also Arthur Robert Buck, uncle of the above, killed in action in France, May 25th 1918, aged 41 years.

Further research into Arthur’s family reveals that his father, Robert Buck, was born c.1833 in Stibbard, the son of James and Elizabeth Buck.[5]  He married Elizabeth Sayers on the 14th November 1856, in Stibbard parish church.[6]  Elizabeth (Betsy) Sayers was baptised on the 4th June 1827 in Stibbard, the daughter of William and Martha Sayers.[7]  Elizabeth Buck died in 1894, aged 57, and is buried at Stibbard.[8]  Robert Buck (a farm labourer) died in 1897, aged 64, and is buried at Aylsham.[9]  The census returns for Stibbard from 1861 to 1891 record Robert and Elizabeth’s growing family, with six sons and four daughters being born between 1857 and 1882:

 

Name Born Died
William 1857, in Stibbard (baptised 18th October 1857).[10] 1937, aged 79.[11] William is buried in Wood Norton.
John 1860, in Stibbard (baptised 25th March 1860).[12] 1942, aged 82.[13]
James 1862, in Stibbard (baptised 16th November 1863).[14]  
Jane 1865, in Stibbard (baptised 30th June 1865).[15]  Jane married William Wright on the 24th December 1891, in Wood Norton parish church. [16]  Their son, Alfred Wright (Arthur’s nephew) was killed in action in 1917 (Palestine). 1950, aged 84.[17] Jane is buried in Wood Norton.
Lucy 1868, in Stibbard (baptised 11th March 1868).[18]  Lucy married William John Snowling in 1896.[19] 1954, aged 86.[20]

 

Thomas 5th May 1870, in Stibbard (baptised 9th June 1870).[21]  
Samuel Henry 1873, in Stibbard (baptised 23rd February 1873).[22] Samuel joined the Royal Engineers on the 14th January 1897, and served for 23 years.  He served at home and abroad, including postings in Sierra Leone, Malta and Hong Kong, before applying for his pension in March 1918.[23] 1938, aged 65.[24]
Eliza 1875, in Stibbard (baptised 11th April 1875).[25] Eliza married Edward James Harrold on the 5th February 1898 in Wood Norton parish church.[26] 1956, aged 81.[27]
Arthur Robert 2nd March 1878, in Stibbard.

In the 1911 census for Wood Norton, Arthur is aged 32, and a gardener.

25th May 1918, the Somme
Mary Elizabeth 16th June 1882, in Stibbard (baptised 10th September 1882).[28]  Mary married Joseph Grint in 1914.[29] 1959, aged 74.[30]

According to the 1901 census for Wood Norton, Arthur was living with his sister, Jane, and brother-in-law, William Wright.[31]  In the 1911 census for Wood Norton, Arthur was lodging with Robert Dack’s family (Robert was the blacksmith and publican of the Sun Public House), and gave his occupation in the census as a gardener.  The 1918 electoral roll lists him as an absent voter, and living at The Brush, Wood Norton.

 

The headstone for Arthur’s niece, Alice, also includes an inscription for Arthur’s nephew, Alfred Wright (Jane and William Wright’s son), which reads:

Also Alfred, their second son, killed in action on Dec. 8th 1917, buried at Enab in Palestine, aged 22 years.

Beneath these inscriptions are the words from Alfred’s military headstone: Death Divides but Memory Clings.

[1] British Army WW1 Medal Roll Index Cards, 1914-1920 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[2] War Dairy, 4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, May 1918 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[3] UK, Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects 1901-1929 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[4] CWGC information for Pozieres Memorial (www.cwgc.org)

[5] 1841 census, Stibbard (p.9, Enumeration Schedule 8)  (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[6] Marriage Register, 1856, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD Quarter to December 1986, Walsingham Vol.4b (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[7] 1841 census, Stibbard (p.16, Enumeration Schedule 11) (www.ancestry.co.uk); Baptism Register, 1837, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[8] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1894, Walsingham Vol.4b, p174 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[9] FreeBMD, Quarter to  December 1897, Aylsham Vol.4b, p64 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Burial Register, 1897, Aylsham (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[10] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1857, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.270 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Baptism Register, 1857, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[11] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1937, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.84 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Burials, 1937 (p.132)

[12] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1860, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.309 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Baptism Register, 1860, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[13] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1942, Wayland, Vol.4b, p.225 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[14] Baptism Register, 1862, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1862, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.274 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[15] Baptism Register, 1865, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk); FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1865, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.267 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[16] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1891, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.269 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1891 (p.97)

[17] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1950, Fakenham, Vol.4b, p.374 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[18] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1868, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.303 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Baptism Register, 1868, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[19] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1896, Loddon, Vol.4b, p.555 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[20] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1954, Lothingland, Vol.4b, p.799 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[21] Baptism Register, 1870, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[22] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1873, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.288 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Baptism Register, 1873, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[23] British Army WW1 Pension Records 1914-1920 (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[24] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1938, Mitford, Vol.4b, p.275 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[25] FreeBMD, Quarter to June 1875, Walsingham, Vol.4b, p.285 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Baptism Register, 1875, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[26] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1898, Aylsham, Vol.4b, p.155 (www.freebmd.org.uk); Transcript and Index to Wood Norton, Norfolk, Parish Registers, compiled by Keith and Shirley Howell (February 2000), Marriages, 1898 (p.98)

[27] FreeBMD, Quarter to December 1956, E. Dereham, Vol.4b, p.411 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[28] Baptism Register, 1882, Stibbard (www.ancestry.co.uk)

[29] FreeBMD, Quarter to September 1914, Norwich, Vol.4b, p.215 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[30] FreeBMD, Quarter to March 1959, Norwich, Vol.4b, p.755 (www.freebmd.org.uk)

[31] 1901 census, Wood Norton (p.3) (www.ancestry.co.uk)

A Canadian in the Norfolk Regiment

Here at the Norfolkinworldwar1 blog we were recently contacted by Mr King-Seguin who let us know about the research he and other family members were undertaking about their Grandfather, who came from Canada yet still served with the Norfolk Regiment. 

Below is a short introduction from William John Grummett’s grandson (Mr. Snell) and a link to the website showcasing all of their fascinating research.

The First World War through the Lens of William J. Grummett, 2nd Lieutenant, Norfolk Regiment: A Soldier’s Story.

William John Grummett (1891-1967) was a young law student living in Canada when the First World War began in 1914.  Honouring a promise made to his parents, he held off enlisting until 1915 and the formation of the second Canadian contingent of soldiers preparing for war in Europe.  Like most young men who signed up to go to war, he was off on the “adventure of a lifetime”.   As it turns out, his journey went much farther than most: to the foothills of the Himalaya Mountains and the headwaters of the sacred Ganges River, to the sun blasted deserts of Mesopotamia and the twin rivers, Tigris and Euphrates that had held between them the very cradle of civilization.  He travelled more than 24,000 nautical miles, 4500 miles by train and countless miles on horseback and on foot.  And, he took photographs documenting the events, places and most remarkably, the people: children, parents, fellow soldiers, street performers, holy men, the devout, herdsmen and refugees, as the journey unfolded.

William John Grummett, 2nd Lieutenant, Norfolk Regiment

Read the story: a new chapter will be added every month completing the tale by November of 2018.   See the pictures: themed photo galleries representing stages of the journey are added to with each new chapter of the story.  The First World War through the Lens of William J. Grummett, 2nd Lieutenant, Norfolk Regiment, at https://wjgrummettphotosandhistoryww1.blog/

As ever if you have a family story to share please get in touch – we are very keen to make sure that these stories are not forgotten.