More unexpected WW1 discoveries

After the excitement of finding the flight gallery dedicated to the First World War in Seattle I didn’t think we’d find any other WW1 connections during our trip, most of it was being spent in National Parks after all.

However the last place we stayed in – Jackson, Wyoming – had a final surprise for us.

The town itself was only incorporated in 1914 (and today has a population under 10000!) and yet in the town square there is a war memorial which includes names from World War One.

Being on holiday I didn’t investigate the names too much but since we’ve been home I’ve looked into it more and discovered that American Memorials can honour all who served not just the dead and that the team looking after Jackson’s memorial are very dedicated and still adding to the people remembered on the statue.

Being curious I’ve looked into WW1 casualties from the area more and just 129 fatalities from the entire state are recorded for Wyoming during this conflict. 11 of these men died in November 1918, and sadly two died after the Armistice was signed (Pte. George W Hughes, 1st Class and Pte. Louis Lourand) – without more research I can’t say if these are Jackson men but I can feel some more research coming on over the winter!

 

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Remembering Wilfred George Lake

The team from Wood Norton have shared some more research with us about a man appearing on their war memorial but while they’ve found out lots about Wilfred George Lake if anyone help tell the stories of his siblings it would be wonderful.

WILFRED GEORGE LAKE

Wilfred George Lake was the youngest son of William and Mary Ann Lake, born in Wood Norton and baptised on the 12th April 1896 at All Saints, Wood Norton (see Figure 1).[1]

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