Commemorating the First World War in Outwell, Norfolk

Dr Charles Nelson, Membership Secretary, Friends of St Clement’s Church, Outwell has been in touch to tell us of a wonderful event held at the church and how to still see some of the work involved.

A spectacular cascade of scarlet, red and  crimson poppies – knitted, crocheted, sewn or needle-felted by members of Welle Women’s Institute and St Clement’s Coffee Shoppers, particularly Elaine Allison, Rebecca Broda, Victoria Brown, Helen Crittle, Sally Harman, Edna Hollands, Margaret Lake, Liz Robson, Ruth Saunders and Linda Shinkin – was “unveiled” on Friday last, 5 October 2018, at St Clement’s Church, Outwell. The cascade of poppies, stitched onto white camouflage webbing, falls from the summit of the staircase in the South Aisle of St Clement’s, and is part of the parish’s commemoration of the centenary of the end of the First World War. The cascade will remain in place until mid-November.
 
The “unveiling” occurred at a very successful concert given by the Upwell Gilbert and Sullivan Choral Society, also a tribute to mark the anniversary.
 
The cascade can be viewed by visitors during the normal Sunday service in St Clement’s, and on Tuesdays when the St Clement’s Coffee Shop is open. [Coffee, tea and cakes are served as well as delicious soup and light lunches. The proceeds from the Coffee Shop go to help keep St Clement’s open for worship.]
 
Other projects currently being supported by the Friends of St Clement’s Church include restoration of some of the antique furniture, including two massive wooden trunks and a fine Jacobean communion table, work funded also by a grant from the Leche Trust. The stabilising and protecting of the splendid mediaeval painted glass, especially that dating from 1420–1440 in the tracery of east window of the Beaupré Chapel in St Clement’s, is also a current project, assisted by the Glaziers Trust.
We thank Dr Nelson for sharing this with us, and also Mr Ashby for taking such lovely photos. If you attended the concert, or you have other WW1 commemoration projects happening, please do let us know.
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A snapshot from the Yarmouth Mercury one hundred years on

This is a dispatch from Orla, one of the Community Librarians based in Great Yarmouth.

What is the finest death to die, And the fairest end to make? To feel as your country’s foemen fly And to die for Freedom’s sake! And to die with the young, this strong, the brave, A flush on your eager soul, Your body borne to a hero’s grave And your name on Honour’s Roll!

What is the finest death to die,
And the fairest end to make?
To feel as your country’s foemen fly
And to die for Freedom’s sake!
And to die with the young, this strong, the brave,
A flush on your eager soul,
Your body borne to a hero’s grave
And your name on Honour’s Roll!

In one week in February 1917 there were three reports of local men and their fate in the First World War in the Yarmouth Mercury:

The death is reported of Pte Sidney Charles Cooper of 80 George Street Yarmouth. Pte Cooper leaves a wife and two children following his death at the front in January. He was a 23 year old box maker employed by Mr Mills of Southtown and an old Church Road School boy. Pte Cooper was in the Essex Regiment.

Arthur E Turner of the Royal Naval Reserves is also reported as killed in action. Turner was formerly of Tower Street and his mother was still living at Caister. He was a married father of four with three brothers also in the Navy. Walter Turner was at this time interned in Holland.

The mother of Pte. E. Littlewood is seeking information on her son this month. Pte Littlewood is of B Company, 6th Platoon, 8th Norfolk’s and is late of the 6th Norfolk Cyclists. Littlewood was reported wounded in October and there has been no information since.

Also reported in the Mercury this month is a concert by blind musicians in aid of “our blinded heroes”. This convert of “unusually interesting character” took place at the Yarmouth Town Hall to aid the St. Dunstan’s Hostel for blinded soldiers and sailors. You can find out more about the St. Dunstan’s hostel here

concert-by-blind-musicians-at-great-yarmouth-town-hall

Visit Great Yarmouth library to access the Great Yarmouth Mercury 1914 to 1919 on microfilm, each week gives a fascinating insight into life at home and away during the Great War.

The Local Studies area in Great Yarmouth library

The Local Studies area in Great Yarmouth library