An update on our poppy project

We’d like to extend a huge thank you to everyone who has been making poppies from whatever material is to hand. With just six months to go until the Armistice 100 Commemorations we thought you’d like an up date of how the poppy appeal is progressing and where you’ll be able to see the poppies.

For reasons of space and storage the main focus has been on working on how to display the felt, knitted and crochet poppies. As of the 5th May we have received about 3700. These are being put on to fabric tape ready to be displayed like bunting.

Small display of woolen poppies

People are also being very creative with paper, crepe paper and even cupcake cases and we have over 600 of these too.

The mathematically inclined will have already worked out that this gives us a total of 4,300 poppies so we have quite a way to go to reach our target of 15,500!

If anyone has some spare time/wool/paper please could you consider making a few to help us out.  We are planning to hold simple poppy craft sessions in libraries on Norfolk Day (27th July) more details on here very soon.

As for displaying the finished poppies…all of Norfolk’s 47 branches will be taking a number of them to display, as will the mobile libraries.  Larger libraries will have slightly larger displays and King’s Lynn, Great Yarmouth and the Millennium Library will have huge displays representing the large number of fallen commemorated in these locations.

Thank you for your help so far, sample patterns can be found here – but please don’t feel these are the only way to make the poppies.

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Inspired by our poppy plea

We’ve just received this lovely letter from Alex in Sheringham

I work as a Library & Information Assistant at Sheringham Library. In June 2017, a poster arrived for display in the Library asking people to make poppies for the Norfolk in WW1 Project.

My grandad had lost his father and his brother in this war, so I decided to make a few poppies. 300 crochet’d poppies later, I turned my attention to Sheringham, where I have lived for 17 years.

Sheringham & Beeston Regis lost 75 men in WW1 and Upper Sheringham lost 8.

I crochet’d 83 poppies and with the help of the Imperial War Museum, the Royal British Legion and Roll of Honour.com. I was able to individually dedicate each poppy with the “fallen” man’s name, typed onto a label and threaded through the poppy.

The poppies have been framed and are on permanent display in Sheringham Library.

Alex’s 300+ poppies have already been strung together ready for display in the autumn, but do pop into Sheringham Library to see these wonderful, named poppies.

2018 Poppy Project Update

For various reasons there have been fewer posts going out on the blog over the last few months and we hope that is about to change and that we’ll be sharing more stories with you very soon.

In the meantime we’d like to say a huge

to everyone around the county who has been making and sending us poppies.

Behind the scenes we have been working on these and are starting to work out how they can be best displayed in the libraries around the county in November 2018.

Here are just a few (2215 to be precise) of the knitted poppies mounted on to bunting tape ready for display:

We also have lots of beautiful felt, plastic and paper poppies still to mount but this is an ongoing project and if you feel at all crafty please do swamp us with more – full details can be found here.

Commemorative Crafting

Commemorative Crafting

There’s nothing better on a grey and drizzly Saturday afternoon than spending time with friends – chatting, snacking, and making things! My friend Felicity and I like to tackle new craft projects, and when Norfolk Libraries decided to mark the 2018 Armistice Centenary with a handmade poppy to represent each fallen Norfolk soldier we really wanted to take part.

The poppies can be made from any material you like – felt, wool, paper, card, fabric, or we’ve even had stained glass ones donated. The only stipulations are that they have to be made by hand and we need 15,500 of them before November 11th, 2018. So we decided to have a go!

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Announcing our 2018 commemoration project

The eagle eyed among our regular blog readers might have spotted that we have added a new page to the blog:

 

This is where you can find all the information regarding how the Norfolkinworldwar1 team are planning to commemorate Armistice Day in 2018.

In short we are asking the people of Norfolk to help us create 15,500 poppies – one for each person commemorated on the county’s war memorials – for us to display in the autumn of 2018.

On this new page you can find all of the important details such as size, where to send them when they are completed along with some pattern ideas for the poppies.

15,500 poppies is a huge number which is why we are starting early but we know that the people of Norfolk (and further away possibly) will get behind our idea and soon desks at the library will resemble a poppy meadow rather than a work space!

Below is a poster about the project – please do share this far and wide – if you’d like it in another format then please just leave a comment here and we’ll get back to you.

Thank you so much in advance for your help,

Sarah and all the Norfolkinworldwar1 team

 

Armistice Commemorations

Cotman Housing Association, with the support of its partners and the local community, organised a special Armistice Day event to remember those who served and fell during the First World War.

cotman planting 1

In the calm surroundings of the Bowthorpe Community Gardens on 11th November 2014, over 140 people, including staff from Cotman Housing, Future Projects, Novus Solutions, Mow & Grow and children from St Michael’s V.A. Middle School and Clover Hill V.A. Infant School and the local community joined together in memory of those who served during World War I.

cotman planting 2

The proceedings began with a welcome from Vicar Mark Elvin and he introduced special guest Len Fox, a Normandy Veteran and a Cotman customer, who thanked everyone for being there.

Len Fox, Normandy Veteran

Len Fox, Normandy Veteran

The students of St Michael’s Middle School, had been assigned with writing poetry to mark this year’s Armistice Day. A selection of these were read out by the students, with their evocative poems perfectly capturing the tragic nature of the First World War and the solemn mood of the event.

cotman planting 6

Major Rushmere and Veteran Len Fox


At 11.00am the traditional two minute silence was held and following this, everyone gathered at the Heritage Gardens to plant poppy seeds and daffodil bulbs.

Cotman planting 5

The event came together as a result of the Association being awarded funding from the Norfolk Armed Forces Community Covenant Board, Norfolk World War 1 Fund. The unique nature of the occasion attracted considerable media interest, with BBC Look East on hand to capture the proceedings. The Association wishes to thank everyone involved in organising the event and those who were in attendance who helped make the day a success.