Scars of War reading 6

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Prisoner of War

During the First World War, 8 million soldiers fighting on the front were taken prisoner and interned in camps for the duration of the war. Repatriation was rare, occasional prisoner exchanges were reserved for a lucky few – mostly the gravely injured.

We have the account Lance Corporal Charles Beales, from just up the road in Great Massingham who was one “of the few” who returned home through the prisoner exchange scheme. His release was just months before the end of the conflict and harrowing details of the four years he spent in captivity were reported in the Lynn News on September 21, 1918.

Cassel POW image from the International Red Cross

Here is his story:

Continue reading

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Armistice Commemorations

With the 100th Anniversary of the Armistice fast approaching we are pleased to be able to share some of the events happening around the county with readers of the blog.

Today we’re letting you know about a concert of music and readings being held at St Andrews Church in Eaton, Norwich which takes place on Saturday 10th November at 7.00pm

Details of price and how to book are on the poster below.


A sneak peak at the programme has been provided and it will include music performed by the whole choir as well as just the male or female members, all of which will be interspersed with appropriate readings.

The full list is below the page cut so if you would rather not know before the concert ‘look away now’ as they say. Continue reading

Update on our Poppy Project from King’s Lynn

We are really touched by just how many people are responding to our Poppy Plea, and how it is encouraging people to connect with the history of their local areas. Today’s update comes from King’s Lynn.

Barbara from All Saints Church in Hillington Square, King’s Lynn writes:

Members of the congregation of the Church I attend, All Saint’, Hillington Square, King’s  Lynn  (http://www.allsaintskingslynn.org.uk/) were impressed to hear about your Project.  

We decided to produce a poppy for each life lost from our Parish, whose name is engraved on the memorial window in the Church, 169 in total.  

The response has been amazing and people were very keen to participate. We have made 220 poppies in total.  

The poppies are displayed on a board within the church and there are exactly 169 poppies within the Crucifix itself.

Barbara and her fellow knitters have also said that this memorial to the fallen of their Parish will stay on display until the end of September and then they are very kindly going to send all 220 poppies into our bigger project to contribute to our countywide memorial.

Thanks to Barbara for sharing this story with us. If you would like to make a poppy or 2 for our project then you can find all of the details here and please do let us know of any of your own Armistice 100 projects.

Scars of War reading 7

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Wounded Soldier

In World War One it is estimated that 2,272,998 British soldiers were wounded. Not including the 16,682 Navy and RFC/RAF. Of that number 64% returned to duty to fight on the front lines.

In King’s Lynn places like the Hanse House were converted into hospitals to cope with the sheer amount of walking wounded returning from the Front.

A group of recovering soldiers at Thorpe St Andrew, Norfolk War Hospital.

One of that vast number of wounded was John Smith Sampher – Private 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment – 203325.

Continue reading

Announcing our 2018 commemoration project

The eagle eyed among our regular blog readers might have spotted that we have added a new page to the blog:

 

This is where you can find all the information regarding how the Norfolkinworldwar1 team are planning to commemorate Armistice Day in 2018.

In short we are asking the people of Norfolk to help us create 15,500 poppies – one for each person commemorated on the county’s war memorials – for us to display in the autumn of 2018.

On this new page you can find all of the important details such as size, where to send them when they are completed along with some pattern ideas for the poppies.

15,500 poppies is a huge number which is why we are starting early but we know that the people of Norfolk (and further away possibly) will get behind our idea and soon desks at the library will resemble a poppy meadow rather than a work space!

Below is a poster about the project – please do share this far and wide – if you’d like it in another format then please just leave a comment here and we’ll get back to you.

Thank you so much in advance for your help,

Sarah and all the Norfolkinworldwar1 team

 

We Will Remember Them

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Living Memory Project.

living-memory

All summer we and many others have been commemorating the hundredth anniversary of the Battle of the Somme.  The Commonwealth War Graves Commission project is called “Living Memory” and they want to make a point of remembering the war graves that are located in the UK – amazingly there are about 300 000 of them.

The Norfolkinworldwar1 team have been contacted by the CWGC to see if we can help remember the war graves that are located in Norfolk – their research has shown that there are 514 graves in the Earlham Road cemetery in Norwich and 275 graves in Caister Old Cemetary.

The Battle of the Somme officially ended on 18th November 1916 and the CWGC would like to remember the men (and possibly women) who are buried in Norfolk’s cemeteries – not necessarily just the two we’ve mentioned here.

If you are interested in finding out more about tVhis project and would like to lay flowers on these graves to remember these people please do contact the @CWGC #LivingMemories project coordinator Virginia – her email is virginia.crompton@bigideascompany.org and she’d love to hear from you.

 

If you do get involved in this project then please do let us know and we’ll mention it here too.

Many thanks on behalf of the Norfolkinworldwar1 team and the Living Memory project!