Event Postponed

Apologies to those interested in this week’s “Author Talk with Edward Glover” to be held on Thursday 27th April – we have had to postpone this event.

We are looking to reschedule in the autumn when Edward will also have another book out and even more to discuss.

As soon as the new date is set we’ll start advertising.

Apologies the Norfolkinww1 team

Images from the archives.

Dozens of similar images of newly erected war memorials from towns and villages all over Norfolk will be added to Picture Norfolk over the next year – although we don’t have an image like this for every place.  They were originally added to the Norwich Public Library Photographic Survey collection in the 1920s and today are held at the Norfolk Heritage Centre.

Reepham Remembers

Ron Luton-Brown from Reepham has recently been in touch about some of the research he’s undertaken into two local men who fell on the same date during Battle of Gaza.

The first is Frederick Eke who was born in the spring of 1896, one of the younger children of Edward and Emily Eke from Whitwell Street. He was just 20 when he died and a Private in the 1/5th Battalion Norfolks service number 240792.

He is commemorated on the Jerusalem War Memorial

The War Memorial in Jerusalem. Image from @CWGC

 

The other Reepham boy who fell in Gaza was Edwin ‘Ted’ Harden who was born in the January Quarter of 1897 to Edwin and Louisa Harden.  It is believed his father died in the Boer War and  that Luisa subsequently remarried. Ted was the middle of three sons and again just 20 at his death.

Edwin ‘Ted’ Harden

He too is commemorated on the Jerusalem War Memorial.

Sadly for Luisa is would appear that her second husband, Jesse Hall, also died during World War One.

Reepham Church exterior from @PictureNorfolk

Both Ted and Frederick will be remembered in Reepham on 19th April – exactly 100 years after their deaths.  They will be prominently featured in the church Memorial Book and this can be viewed in chancel of St Michael’s which is open every day.

Interior of St Michael’s Church Reepham from @PictureNorfolk

 

The Battles of Gaza are being commemorated in Norwich with an exhibition at the Forum. This is open daily until May 4th.

 

A Walk in the cemetery part one.

Earlier in the spring, when the weather was decidedly changeable my husband and I went for a walk in our local cemetery, we were primarily looking for the drifts of snowdrops but then we came across one of the two Commonwealth War Graves plots within the Earlham Cemetery here in Norwich.

Two graves in particular caught my eye and I have spent a little bit of time investigating the two men commemorated on them:

This headstone reads:

7717 Private

J.Reford

Royal Inniskilling Fus

21st August 1914 Age 30

The first thing that caught my eye was that he died just 17 days after war was declared. We then had to find out if he was wounded in France very early on and returned to the UK where he then died. I pretty much instantly dismissed this thought as I didn’t think that an injured soldier would have been transferred to Norwich with wounds this early in the war.

Thanks to the Long Long Trail website I have discovered that Private Reford served with the 2nd Btn of the Fusiliers, who at the out break of were stationed in Dover but that sometime that month they were moved to Norfolk. They weren’t here for long however as they landed at Le Havre on the 22nd of August, the day after Pte. Reford’s death.

I wanted to know more and so using the National Archives site I discovered that the War Diaries for the Btn were available online for the dates I was interested in so I paid to download them. While they are a totally compelling and fascinating read sadly they are prefaced with a handwritten note:

WO 95/1505/2

Arrrrrrrrrrrrrghhh – the diary starts on the 25th August, the rest of the month isn’t there as it was assumed it had already been sent in!

The Regimental Museum for the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers does offer a tracing service (temporarily offline) and I will be contacting them and also using some of the resources they suggest to see if I can find out any more about the death of Pte. Reford.

However, as ever, if anyone else has already researched this man and his death and would like to share them with us we’d be very grateful.

 

Images from the archives

Dozens of similar images of newly erected war memorials from towns and villages all over Norfolk will be added to Picture Norfolk over the next year – although we don’t have an image like this for every place.  They were originally added to the Norwich Public Library Photographic Survey collection in the 1920s and today are held at the Norfolk Heritage Centre.

World War One Author event at the Millennium Library

Earlier this year we featured the author Edward Glover here on the Norfolkinworldwar1 site as he told us a little about the dedication he placed at the start of his newest book – A Motif of Seasons.

We are really pleased to say that Edward has agreed to give a talk about his writing and also more about this dedication at the Norfolk and Norwich Millennium Library.

The event will take place on 27th April at 7pm and tickets are just £2.  This event coincides with the Forum’s Finding the Fallen exhibition about the Battle of Gaza so why not plan some time to look around that as well before the talk?

To book tickets please call 01603 774703 or email millennium.lib@norfolk.gov.uk.

War Diary April 1917

War Norfolk
America Joins the War

Following on from the Zimmerman Affair, President Woodrow Wilson declares war on Germany

Lifeboat Man Rewarded

Coxswain Henry G Blogg of Cromer Lifeboat was presented with the Lifeboat Institution’s gold medal for courage and devotion after rescuing the crew of S S Ferebo. The 4-mast steamer struck a mine off Cromer and split in two in rough seas in January 1917.

Battle on All Fronts

 Attacks are launched by the Allies in France, Salonika and Gaza for very few gains. The exception is the success of the Canadians who seize Vimy Ridge.

Food Restrictions

 In an effort to combat the food shortages caused by the German submarine blockade Norfolk people were warned in the press that  “If you waste food stuffs or eat more than the recognised daily allowance you are a traitor to your country.”  Meanwhile an auctioneer at Wells-next-Sea was fined 60s for selling potatoes in Burnham above the regulated price of the Food Control Act.