Scars of War reading 7

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Wounded Soldier

In World War One it is estimated that 2,272,998 British soldiers were wounded. Not including the 16,682 Navy and RFC/RAF. Of that number 64% returned to duty to fight on the front lines.

In King’s Lynn places like the Hanse House were converted into hospitals to cope with the sheer amount of walking wounded returning from the Front.

A group of recovering soldiers at Thorpe St Andrew, Norfolk War Hospital.

One of that vast number of wounded was John Smith Sampher – Private 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment – 203325.

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Scars of War reading 6

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Prisoner of War

During the First World War, 8 million soldiers fighting on the front were taken prisoner and interned in camps for the duration of the war. Repatriation was rare, occasional prisoner exchanges were reserved for a lucky few – mostly the gravely injured.

We have the account Lance Corporal Charles Beales, from just up the road in Great Massingham who was one “of the few” who returned home through the prisoner exchange scheme. His release was just months before the end of the conflict and harrowing details of the four years he spent in captivity were reported in the Lynn News on September 21, 1918.

Cassel POW image from the International Red Cross

Here is his story:

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War Diary December 1918

 

War Norfolk
Occupation of Germany Begins

 Allied troops enter Germany on December 1st. Some areas of Germany remain occupied until the 1930s

Prisoners of War start to return home

Wroxham man, Corpl. Arthur C Drake returned home in December 1918 – he joined up within a month of war starting, went to France in August 1915, was wounded in 1916 and captured by the Germans in April 1918. The press carried a full description of his time in captivity.

British Election

Prime Minister David Lloyd George wins the general election at the head of a national (coalition) government.  This is the first election in which British women aged over 30 could vote.

Defence of the Realm Act Laws still in force.

A Wymondham publican was fined £1 for and allowing people to remain in his taproom drinking well after closing time. The drinks had been poured before ‘time’ at 9.00pm. Those caught drinking were also fined.

Scars of War reading 5

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Nurse

At the outbreak of war in August 1914, the means of transporting the sick and wounded had advanced little since the Boer War some twelve years previous. They were still using horse drawn ambulance wagons and nurses were sent on horseback to tend to the wounded when the ambulance was too slow.

The earliest weeks of the war shattered any illusion this could continue and motorised ambulances quickly replaced the horse drawn wagon across the Western Front. Ambulance drivers like Violet Tillson and Mem Custance were on the front lines of the Western Front helping wounded soldiers at Ypres, The Somme and Verdun.

Field Ambulance Unit soldiers, First World War. This image forms part of the Percy Trett Collection, from the Time and Tide Museum/Picture Norfolk

Perhaps the most famous nurse of the First World War was Edith Cavell. Continue reading

Scars of War reading 4

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Munitions Worker

King’s Lynn had two main munitions factories during World War 1. To the north His Majesty’s Factory on the Alexandra Dock and Cooper Roller Bearings to the south. Savages had also converted their ironworks for war work in the manufacture of aeroplanes.

King’s Lynn, fabric department staff of Savage’s factory in 1917 – image from Picture Norfolk

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Scars of War reading 3

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum

The Christmas Truce

By December 1914 soldiers on both sides had settled into the routine life of living in the trenches of Northern France. Between battles there would be periods of quiet and trenches were often close enough that the soldiers began to banter and barter for items such as cigarettes.

An old pack of British Woodbine cigarettes, photographed at the Musée Somme 1916 of Albert (Somme), France – image from Wikipedia

One such soldier was Harry Bloom, the son of Charles and Jenny Bloom of 18 Checker Street. At seventeen he Joined the Militia and transferred to the Regular Army in 1906 for service in the Norfolk Regiment. He served in South Africa and India prior to the war. In 1913 he joined the Army Reserve and worked at Cooper Roller Bearings which became a munitions factory during the war. He married a woman called Jeannie and they lived at 11 Edwards Yard off Providence Street.

King’s Lynn, interior of the Cooper Roller Bearings factory. Image from Picture Norfolk

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Scars of War reading 2

As promised here as some of the readings/research made in West Norfolk for the Scars of War project in the autumn of 2018: The research for this piece was undertaken by Lindsey Bavin, manager at the True’s Yard Fisherfolk Museum. The museum holds photos from 1915 showing the damage caused in the Zeppelin raids.

The Zeppelin Raid of Lynn

Alice Maud Rowe was born in July 1888. In 1909 she married Percy George Gazley from Wisbech. He had enlisted in the Army in 1904 and served as a private for three years. With the outbreak of war Percy was once again called up to fight in the 3rd Battalion, Prince Consort’s Own Rifles. On 27th October 1914 he was killed shortly before the First Battle of Ypres.

Riffleman Gazley is commemorated on Panel 10 of the Ploegsteert Memorial (image from G Skinner)

On the night of 19th January 1915, Alice was dining with her neighbours Mr and Mrs Fayers of 11 Bentinck Street (now St James Street and Blackfriars Street) just a few doors down from her own Rose Cottage.  She was unaware that two Zeppelins had set out across the Channel.  Their original target had been the docks and industrial areas of Humberside but strong winds instead led to their arrival at Norfolk’s coastline around 7.55pm. Continue reading