War Diary June 1918

War Norfolk
Battle of the Piave

The Austro-Hungarians launch a renewed attack on the Italian line in the north-east along the River Piave. The attack is beaten off. Fighting continues to 24 June.

Flying Tragedy

 An inquest was opened to investigate the deaths of three RAF pilots. The Tragedy occurred after two biplanes collided during flight, one of the pilots was from the American Army and learning to fly with the RAF.

  Record Amounts of Money Raised in Holt

The King sent his praises to the people of Holt after they raised £100, 000 during War Savings Week.

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War Diary May 2018

War Norfolk
Final German Air Raid on London

The largest, and final, German aeroplane raid on London takes place involving 33 aircraft. 49 people are killed and 177 wounded.

Prisoners of War Recaptured

Two German prisoners who escaped from a King’s Lynn internment camp were recaptured on Saturday 4th May.

Third Battle of the Aisne.

 Third German offensive (Operation Blucher) against the French line,  it centres on the Chemin des Dames area above the River Aisne. Fighting continues to 6 June.

Land Army Recruitment Rally

A demonstration took place in Norwich to encourage recruitment for the Women’s Land Army on Saturday 25th May. The demonstration included women carrying small livestock, rakes and hoes, a procession of milk floats and hay carts, as well as a traction engine.

War Diary April 2018

War Norfolk
Further Rationing and Conscription

 Meat rationing is introduced in the UK and conscription extended to those aged up to 51 and men living in Ireland

Fundraising Effort in Norwich

 A Tank named the “Nelson” visited Norwich raising money for the war effort. £400 000 was raised on the first day.

RAF Formed

 The army’s Royal Flying Corps is combined with the naval Royal Naval Air Service to create a separate service.

Butter Mountain

A glut of butter and margarine built up in Norfolk shops as Norfolk residents obtained their butter from farms, despite having registered with a shopkeeper.

War Diary March 1918

War Norfolk
First 1918 Battle of Somme

 The Germans launch a strong offensive in France (Operation Michael) aimed at splitting the British and French lines. The British in particular suffer heavy casualties and begin a far reaching withdrawal. Fighting continues to 5 April.

 

Rationing Plan for Norwich Drawn Up

The Norwich Food Control Committee have adopted a scheme of rationing with regard to meat, butter and margarine and will be put into force on April 7th. It will then become impossible to obtain these goods for consumption without an individual card or an official order form in the case of caters and institutions.

Paris Shelled

Following their advance through the former Allied lines, the Germans use a long range railway gun to shell Paris. This continues to 15 August.

New Children’s Home for Orphans

With places especially reserved for children orphaned by the war, 40 boys are now in residence at Hook’s Hill House.

‘Shortacre’ will be the adjoining house for girls and will shortly be opened. Gifts of clothes, old or new are welcome.

First World War Women of Norfolk: On Active Service – an exhibition in Norwich

First World War Women of Norfolk: On Active Service Exhibition

Girl Land workers in the snow at Thetford , Norfolk
19 January 1918

The Forum, Norwich, is launching a new exhibition celebrating the remarkable effort made by women across Norfolk on active service during the First World War.

Running from Saturday 4 November to Sunday 19 November in The Forum Gallery and the Norfolk and Norwich Millennium Library, the free exhibition brings their stories to life. Continue reading

Brock Family Letters – September – October 1917

George Edward Brock to Charles Edward Brock

Sept 9th 1917

Dear Charles,

Just a line to let you know I am across the channel and my address is 140238 Pte G E Brock, Norfolk Regiment, I.B.D., A.P.O., France.  We are having a good time and all the third line Yeomanry are out this time.  So it is much better than coming out with strangers.

I have been wondering how you are getting on and how do you like your job.  No doubt you have plenty of work to do and I should like to see you but of course I don’t know where you are at all.  The people seem very strange about here and I can’t make them out at all.  And I find you have to keep your eyes open when you are buying anything down here and this morning I bought some pears and apples and afterwards I found they were about two for sixpence.

I hope you are quite well and remember me to Milly when you write.

From

George


George Edward Brock to Charles Edward Brock

Sept 11th 1917

Dear Charles,

Just to let you know that I am in a new regiment.  My new number is 33695, 8th Yorks and Lancs so don’t write till you hear from me.

I am feeling fit and well and don’t mind being on foot after cavalry although everything seems strange and new.

Hoping you are quite well.

From your brother

George


George Edward Brock to Kate Maud Brock

Oct 3rd 1917

Dear Kate,

Thanks very much for your letter and it is jolly good of you to write because it cheers one so to hear from home and I feel rather lonely but now I am getting used to it.

I am glad to hear you are getting on alright and what do you think this morning I received a letter from Jimmy Muirhead so it shows I am not forgotten.

We are having some fine weather at present so it is one consolation and I hope it will keep on because it makes such a difference to us.

I don’t know what to write about only I am quite well and one thing I hope and that is to be back again soon so goodbye sis.  I hope you are quite well and glad to hear you are getting on alright at Dereham.

From

George

Please excuse dirty envelope.


George Edward Brock to Charles Edward Brock

Oct 4th 1917

Dear Charles,

Just to let you know I am quite well and we are just having a rest and sorry I could not answer your letter because I lost the address.

We are having some fine weather at present and glad to say we are in comfortable quarters now and of course you don’t know I am in a different regiment.  Well my new address is 33695 Pte G E B, No 5 Platoon, B Company, 8 York and Lancs, B E F, France.

The boys seemed very strange at first but I soon got used them and they are all jolly good fellows and I like them very much.

I had a letter from home to day and dad has got the steam plough for the land and J H G has let two of his men help so it is a good job for him.

You would laugh if you saw me now marching about in shorts like some boy scout and my knees felt very cold for the first week or two but I have got used to them by now and they are much better for marching.

I suppose you have plenty of work to do now and I wondered if you came across Mr. Wrench since you have been out because I wish you would remember me to him.

I don’t know what else to write about so remember me to Milly and the boy and I hope you are quite well.

From yours

sincerely George


Gertrude Rebecca Page (née Brock) to Charles Edward Brock

Keswick Mills

Norwich

Oct 21st 17

My dear Charles,

Have some sad news to tell you, poor old George was killed on the 13th Oct.  It’s a terrible blow to us all and am sure you will feel it too. I felt I must write and tell you, but I hardly know what to say nor how to write it as my heart so full.

We were very glad to have such a nice letter from you and wish it would soon be over so you could come home.

Alfred has been in bed for a week, he’s been queer.  I wish they would discharge him but no such luck, he’s gone down to C2.

We are having a nice spell of weather again now.

Mother and Dad are very much distressed and Dad didn’t want this just now, however we have to bear it and thousands have to do the same and will have to yet I am afraid.

Love from all at home.

Your affectionate sister Gert


A.P.O. =  Army Post Office

B.E.F.  =  British Expeditionary Force

I.B.D.  =  Infantry Base Depot