Scars of War – the men behind the graffiti 2

As promised last month here is some more information about the graffiti that inspired the Scars of War project that took place in West Norfolk this autumn.  We are very grateful to Kevin Hitchcock for all the research he has undertaken uncovering the fascinating stories behind the names.  This post is all about one man who left his mark, literally in the tower of King’s Lynn library.

Alexander Edward Lovegrove.

Alex Lovegrove was born in Oxford, the only child of Edward and Matilda. Edward was a Brewer’s agent and by 1901 the family was living in Caversham on the Oxfordshire-Berkshire border. At the age of 14, Alex was already in full-time work as a clerk and photographer for the John Warwick Motor and Cycle works, known for its famous Monarch cycles.

Alex had also found fame, he was an outstanding athlete. His exploits as a member of the Reading Athletics Club were reported in papers across the country at a time when athletics was still strictly amateur and, in an age, when to be famous, you had to be good at something! Continue reading

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Scars of War – the men behind the graffiti 1

As promised last month here is some more information about the graffiti that inspired the Scars of War project that took place in West Norfolk this autumn.  We are very grateful to Kevin Hitchcock for all the research he has undertaken uncovering the fascinating stories behind the names.  This post is all about one man who left his mark, literally in the tower of King’s Lynn library.

Aubrey Cato
Born 1893, died October 1916 Somme.

Aubrey Cato was born in the quiet and picturesque Cotswold region of Oxfordshire. His father was a shepherd, his mother died when he was only a year old, perhaps due to complications caused by child-birth. Before the war he was living in Bampton and working as a farm labourer. Bampton is a small town now famous for being used as a film location for Downton Abbey. They were not a wealthy family and times were difficult for farm workers, but he would’ve been comfortable working with horses, and when war came, Aubrey volunteered to join his county Yeomanry, the Queen’s Own Oxfordshire Hussars (QOOH). He did not join alone, his best friend and near neighbour, William Hudson joined too.

Queen’s Own Oxfordshire Hussars cap badge (image Wikimedia)

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Scars of War – the inspiration behind the project

As promised last month here is some more information about the graffiti that inspired the Scars of War project that took place in West Norfolk this autumn.  We are very grateful to Kevin Hitchcock for all the research he has undertaken uncovering the fascinating stories behind the names.  This post will explain the general history and the following ones will be the stories of just three of the men.

Scars of War – the graffiti

King’s Lynn Library was barely ten years old when hostilities broke out in 1914. Opened by Carnegie himself, the library was a source of great civic pride, its architecture forming a much-loved landmark that still attracts tourists to this day. Few, however, realise as they pass by the Library, that it holds a sad and poignant secret story that is only now being told.

King’s Lynn, the opening of King’s Lynn Public Library by Andrew Carnegie (image from Picture Norfolk)

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